1 définition, 37 pages, 28 articles pour «style»

Vous pouvez consulter la page d'explications relative au nuage de mots clés et aux techniques utilisées.

1 définition

  • [1] style
    Nous devons éviter si possible d'utiliser les éléments ou attributs HTML qui définissent la……
    Catégorie = Graphisme, Web

37 pages

  • [1] Historique
    19/03/02 00:00 L'historique du site, les différents styles, la structure de l'infobrol...
    Mot clé = chapitre | Niveau = 1

  • [2] An.A : Exemple de CSS
    12/08/06 22:39 CSS Annexe A : Un exemple de feuille de style pour HTML 4.0 Traduction en français des spécifications CSS du W3C. Ces informations proviennent du site www.y
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [3] CSS : les feuilles de style
    12/12/03 00:00 Les premières notions sur les feuilles de style.
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [4] HTML5: tags details et summary
    19/03/10 00:00 Les éléments details et summary en HTML5. Exemples et syntaxe. Exemple de style css pour les tags details et summary.
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [5] Les feuilles de styles auditives
    12/08/06 22:39 CSS Les feuilles de styles auditives Traduction en français des spécifications CSS du W3C. Ces informations proviennent du site www.yoyodesign
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [6] XML avec style : les CSS
    11/07/04 00:00 Première méthode pour maîtriser l'affichage d'un document xml : les feuilles de styles en cascades (CSS)
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [7] zut... perdu
    12/08/06 23:05 CSS Les feuilles de style en cascade, niveau 2 Traduction en français des spécifications CSS du W3C. Ces informations proviennent du site www.yoyodesign.org
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 2

  • [8] CSS du site
    06/01/10 23:08 Les feuilles de style utilisées sur le site
    Mot clé = cascading-stylesheet | Niveau = 8

  • [9] Modifier Xp
    08/03/04 02:14 Comment modifier le style de Windows Xp ?
    Mot clé = arborescence | Niveau = 8

  • [10] Démo htaccess
    12/03/06 11:59 Pages de démonstration de quelques possibilités offertes par les fichiers .htaccess, .htpasswd, et .htgroups (personnalisation de la navigation dans les rép
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [11] htaccess:apparence
    12/03/06 12:05 fichiers .htaccess : personnalisation de la navigation dans les répertoires du site, modifier les icônes des fichiers et répertoires, masquer des fichiers,
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [12] javax.swing.text
    30/10/06 00:54 javax.swing.text Les API Java 1.5 du site de sun. En anglais...
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [13] SOAPBinding.Style
    14/04/08 01:40 javax.jws.soap.SOAPBinding.Style
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [14] Sommaire Web
    19/03/02 00:00 Sommaire du chapitre IV: Concept Web.
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [15] Style
    29/08/06 23:53 javax.swing.text.Style Les API Java 1.5 du site de sun. En anglais...
    Mot clé = style | Niveau = 9

  • [16] La Grand Poste de Liège - L'union fait la force
    31/05/18 01:06 La Grand Poste de Liège est un édifice public construit entre 1894 et 1905, rue de la Régence, au centre-ville de Liège, selon les plans de l'architecte Edmond Jamar. Cet édifice néogothique marie les techniques modernes en utilisant le métal dans la structure portante intérieure et les styles traditionnels. Il est doté d'une tourelle octogonale coiffée d'une flèche, de statues représentant des corps de métier, et de colonnes à chapiteaux figurés. Le bâtiment désaffecté est classé (façades et toitures) depuis fin 2002. Divers projets ont été étudiés pour sa reconversion. Le dernier projet qui date de 2009 transforme le bâtiment en hôtel et commerces. Source : Wikipedia
    Mot clé = La Grand Poste de Liège - L'union fait la force | Niveau = 11

  • [17] Istanbul, Topkapi palace - Imperial Council (Defterhāne)
    22/05/18 01:06 Defterhāne This picture shows the third chamber called Defterhāne. Imperial Council The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building is the chamber in which the ministers of state, council ministers (Dîvân Heyeti), the Imperial Council, consisting of the Grand Vizier (Paşa Kapısı), viziers, and other leading officials of the Ottoman state, held meetings. It is also called Kubbealtı, which means "under the dome", in reference to the dome in the council main hall. It is situated in the northwestern corner of the courtyard next to the Gate of Felicity. The first Council chambers in the palace were built during the reign of Mehmed II, and the present building dates from the period of Süleyman the Magnificent by the chief architect Alseddin. It has since undergone several changes, was much damaged and restored after the Harem fire of 1665, and according to the entrance inscription it was also restored during the periods of Selim III and Mahmud II. From the 18th century onwards, the place began to lose its original importance, as state administration was gradually transferred to the Sublime Porte (Bâb-ı Âli) of the Grand Viziers. The last meeting of the Council in the palace chambers was held on Wednesday, August 30, 1876, when the cabinet (Vükela Heyeti) met to discuss the state of Murat V, who had been indisposed for some time. The council hall has multiple entrances both from inside the palace and from the courtyard. The porch consists of multiple marble and porphyry pillars, with an ornate green and white-coloured wooden ceiling decorated with gold. The floor is covered in marble. The entrances into the hall from outside are in the rococo style, with gilded grills to admit natural light. While the pillars are earlier Ottoman style, the wall paintings and decorations are from the later rococo period. Inside, the Imperial Council building consists of three adjoining main rooms. Two of the three domed chambers of this building open into the porch and the courtyard. The Divanhane, built with a wooden portico at the corner of the Divan Court (Divan Meydani) in the 15th century, was later used as the mosque of the council but was removed in 1916. There are three domed chambers: - The first chamber where the Imperial Council held its deliberations is the Kubbealtı. - The second chamber was occupied by the secretarial staff of the Imperial Divan. - In the adjacent third chamber called Defterhāne (this view) , records were kept by the head clerks. The last room also served as a document archive. On its facade are verse inscriptions, which mention the restoration work carried out in 1792 and 1819, namely under Sultan Selim III and Mahmud II. The rococo decorations on the façade and inside the Imperial Council date from this period. The main chamber Kubbealtı is, however, decorated with Ottoman Kütahya tiles. Three long sofas along the sides were the seats for the officials, with a small hearth in the middle. The small gilded ball that hangs from the ceiling represents the earth. It is placed in front of the sultan's window and symbolizes him dispensing justice to the world, as well as keeping the powers of his viziers in check. In the Imperial Council meetings, the political, administrative and religious affairs of the state and important concerns of the citizens were discussed. The Imperial Council normally met four times a week (Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday) after prayer at dawn. The meetings of the Imperial Council were run according to an elaborate and strict protocol. Council members such as the Grand Vizier, viziers, chief military officials of the Muslim Judiciary (Kazaskers) of Rumelia and Anatolia, the Minister of Finance or heads of the Treasury (defterdar), the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Reis-ül-Küttab) and sometimes the Grand Müfti (Sheikh ül-İslam) met here to discuss and decide the affairs of state. Other officials who were allowed were the Nişancilar secretaries of the Imperial Council and keepers of the royal monogram (tuğra) and the officials charged with the duty of writing official memoranda (Tezkereciler), and the clerks recording the resolutions. From the window with the golden grill, the Sultan or the Valide Sultan was able to follow deliberations of the council without being noticed. The window could be reached from the imperial quarters in the adjacent Tower of Justice (Adalet Kulesi). When the sultan rapped on the grill or drew the red curtain, the Council session was terminated, and the viziers were summoned one by one to the Audience Hall (Arz Odası) to present their reports to the sultan. All the statesmen, apart from the Grand Vizier, performed their dawn prayers in the Hagia Sophia and entered the Imperial Gate according to their rank, passing through the Gate of Salutation and into the divan chamber, where they would wait for the arrival of the Grand Vizier. The Grand Vizier performed his prayers at home, and was accompanied to the palace by his own attendants. On his arrival there, he was given a ceremonial welcome, and before proceeding to the imperial divan, he would approach the Gate of Felicity and salute it as if paying his respects to the gate of the sultan's house. He entered the chamber and took his seat directly under the sultan's window and council commenced. Affairs of the state were generally discussed until noon, when the members of the Council dined in the chambers and after which petitions were heard here. All the members of Ottoman society, men and women of all creeds, were granted a hearing. An important ceremony was held to mark the first Imperial Council of each new Grand Vizier, and also to mark his presentation with the Imperial Seal (Mühr-ü Hümayûn). The most important ceremony took place every three months during the handing out of salaries (ulûfe) to the Janissaries. The reception of foreign dignitaries was normally arranged for the same day, creating an occasion to reflect the wealth and might of the state. Ambassadors were then received by the Grand Vizier in the Council chambers, where a banquet was held in their honour. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - version 10Mar2012 See also in my flickr albums: Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque of Istanbul), Hagia Sophia, the Rüstem Pasha Mosque Camera infos: Camera: Nikon D7000 Lens: Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 EX DC OS Exposure 0.05 sec (1/20) Aperture f/6.3 Focal Length 20 mm ISO Speed 100 Date: February 22, 2012 GPS Latitude 41 deg 0' 45.92" N GPS Longitude 28 deg 59' 1.72" E
    Mot clé = Istanbul, Topkapi palace - Imperial Council (Defterhāne) | Niveau = 12

  • [18] M134 Minigun
    06/07/18 01:06 The M134 Minigun is a 7.62 mm, six-barreled machine gun with a high rate of fire (2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute), employing Gatling-style rotating barrels with an external power source. The term "Minigun" has popularly come to refer to any externally powered Gatling gun of rifle caliber, though the term is sometimes used to refer to guns of similar rates of fire and configuration, regardless of power source and caliber. Specifically, minigun refers to a specific model of weapon, originally produced by General Electric. The "Mini" of the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric's earlier 20 mm M61 Vulcan, and "gun" referencing the delineation between a cannon, that of a caliber higher than 20 millimeters—and gun—within certain ranges. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Mot clé = M134 Minigun | Niveau = 13

  • [19] Halászbástya
    04/07/18 01:06 Fisherman's Bastion The Halászbástya or Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II. From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill. Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896. The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths. A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life. It was featured as a Pit Stop on the sixth season of The Amazing Race. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Halászbástya | Niveau = 14

  • [20] Gellért gyógyfürdő
    26/06/18 01:06 Gellért Baths Part of the famous Hotel Gellért in Buda, the Gellért Thermal Baths and Swimming Pool (also known as the Gellért Baths or in Hungarian as the Gellért fürdő) is a bath complex in Budapest, Hungary. History The bath complex was built between 1912 and 1918 in the (Secession) Art Nouveau style. It was damaged during World War II, but then rebuilt. References to healing waters in this location are found from as early as the 13th century. A hospital was located on this site during the Middle Ages. During the reign of the Ottoman Empire, baths were also built on this particular site. The "magical healing spring" used the Turkish during the 16th and 17th centuries. The bath was called Sárosfürdő ("muddy” bath), because the mineral mud settled at the bottom of pools.
    Mot clé = Gellért gyógyfürdő | Niveau = 15

  • [21] In Memoriam
    07/07/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = In Memoriam | Niveau = 16

  • [22] Wanderbuch, Jewish Museum 2
    21/06/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Wanderbuch, Jewish Museum 2 | Niveau = 17

  • [23] Wanderbuch, Jewish Museum 3
    21/06/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Wanderbuch, Jewish Museum 3 | Niveau = 18

  • [24] Hirdetmény - Jewish Museum 4
    19/06/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Hirdetmény - Jewish Museum 4 | Niveau = 19

  • [25] Jewish Museum 5
    03/07/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Jewish Museum 5 | Niveau = 20

  • [26] Jewish Museum 6
    03/07/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Jewish Museum 6 | Niveau = 21

  • [27] Jewish Museum 7
    03/07/18 01:06 Jewish Museum The Jewish Museum was constructed on the plot where Theodor Herzl's two-story Classicist style house used to stand, adjoining the Dohány synagogue. The Jewish Museum was built in 1930 in accordance with the synagogue's architectural style and attached in 1931 to the main building. It holds the Jewish Religious and Historical Collection, a collection of religious relics of the Pest Hevrah Kaddishah (Jewish Burial Society), ritual objects of Shabbat and the High Holidays and a Holocaust room. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Jewish Museum 7 | Niveau = 22

  • [28] Dohány utcai zsinagóga
    24/06/18 01:06 Dohány Street Synagogue The Dohány Street Synagogue (Hungarian: Dohány utcai zsinagóga/nagy zsinagóga, Hebrew: בית הכנסת הגדול של בודפשט‎ bet hakneset hagadol šel budapešt), also known as The Great Synagogue or Tabakgasse Synagogue, is located in Erzsébetváros, the 7th district of Budapest. It is the largest synagogue in Europe and the fifth largest in the world. It seats 3,000 people and is a centre of Neolog Judaism. The synagogue was built between 1854 and 1859 in the Moorish Revival style, with the decoration based chiefly on Islamic models from North Africa and medieval Spain (the Alhambra). The synagogue's Viennese architect, Ludwig Förster, believed that no distinctively Jewish architecture could be identified, and thus chose "architectural forms that have been used by oriental ethnic groups that are related to the Israelite people, and in particular the Arabs". The interior design is partly by Frigyes Feszl. The Dohány Street Synagogue complex consists of the Great Synagogue, the Heroes' Temple, the graveyard, the Holocaust memorial and the Jewish Museum, which was built on the site on which Theodore Herzl's house of birth once stood. Dohány Street itself, a leafy street in the city center, carries strong Holocaust connotations as it constituted the border of the Budapest Ghetto. History Built in a residential area between 1854-1859 by the Neolog Jewish community of Pest according to the plans of Ludwig Förster, the monumental synagogue has a capacity of 2,964 seats (1,492 for men and 1,472 in the women's galleries) making it the largest in Europe and one of the largest working synagogue in the World, after the Belz Great Synagogue and the Beit Midrash of Ger in Jerusalem, the Breslov Uman Synagogue in Uman, Ukraine, Temple Emanu-el in New York City, and the Yetev Lev D'Satmar synagogue in New York City. The consecration of the synagogue took place on 6 September 1859. The synagogue was bombed by the Hungarian pro-Nazi Arrow Cross Party on 3 February 1939. Used as a base for German Radio and also as a stable during World War II, the building suffered some severe damage from aerial raids during the Nazi Occupation but especially during the Siege of Budapest. During the Communist era the damaged structure became again a prayer house for the much-diminished Jewish community. Its restoration started in 1991 and ended in 1998. The restoration was financed by the state and by private donations. Exterior The building is 75 metres (246 ft) long and 27 metres (89 ft) wide. The style of the Dohány Street Synagogue is Moorish but its design also features a mixture of Byzantine, Romantic and Gothic elements. Two onion-shaped domes sit on the twin octogonal towers at 43 metres (141 ft) height. A rose stained-glass window sits over the main entrance. Similarly to basilicas, the building consists of three spacious richly decorated aisles, two balconies and, unusually, an organ. Its ark contains various torah scrolls taken from other synagogues destroyed during the Holocaust. The Central Synagogue in Manhattan, New York City is a near-exact copy of the Dohány Street Synagogue.
    Mot clé = Dohány utcai zsinagóga | Niveau = 23

  • [29] A zsinagóga belseje
    28/06/18 01:06 Dohány Street Synagogue The Dohány Street Synagogue (Hungarian: Dohány utcai zsinagóga/nagy zsinagóga, Hebrew: בית הכנסת הגדול של בודפשט‎ bet hakneset hagadol šel budapešt), also known as The Great Synagogue or Tabakgasse Synagogue, is located in Erzsébetváros, the 7th district of Budapest. It is the largest synagogue in Europe and the fifth largest in the world. It seats 3,000 people and is a centre of Neolog Judaism. The synagogue was built between 1854 and 1859 in the Moorish Revival style, with the decoration based chiefly on Islamic models from North Africa and medieval Spain (the Alhambra). The synagogue's Viennese architect, Ludwig Förster, believed that no distinctively Jewish architecture could be identified, and thus chose "architectural forms that have been used by oriental ethnic groups that are related to the Israelite people, and in particular the Arabs". The interior design is partly by Frigyes Feszl. The Dohány Street Synagogue complex consists of the Great Synagogue, the Heroes' Temple, the graveyard, the Holocaust memorial and the Jewish Museum, which was built on the site on which Theodore Herzl's house of birth once stood. Dohány Street itself, a leafy street in the city center, carries strong Holocaust connotations as it constituted the border of the Budapest Ghetto. History Built in a residential area between 1854-1859 by the Neolog Jewish community of Pest according to the plans of Ludwig Förster, the monumental synagogue has a capacity of 2,964 seats (1,492 for men and 1,472 in the women's galleries) making it the largest in Europe and one of the largest working synagogue in the World, after the Belz Great Synagogue and the Beit Midrash of Ger in Jerusalem, the Breslov Uman Synagogue in Uman, Ukraine, Temple Emanu-el in New York City, and the Yetev Lev D'Satmar synagogue in New York City. The consecration of the synagogue took place on 6 September 1859. The synagogue was bombed by the Hungarian pro-Nazi Arrow Cross Party on 3 February 1939. Used as a base for German Radio and also as a stable during World War II, the building suffered some severe damage from aerial raids during the Nazi Occupation but especially during the Siege of Budapest. During the Communist era the damaged structure became again a prayer house for the much-diminished Jewish community. Its restoration started in 1991 and ended in 1998. The restoration was financed by the state and by private donations. Interior The torah-ark and the internal frescoes made of colored and golden geometric shapes are the works of the famous Hungarian romantic architect Frigyes Feszl. A single-span cast iron supports the 12-metre-wide (39 ft) nave. The seats on the ground-floor are for men, while the upper gallery, supported by steel ornamented poles, has seats for women. Franz Liszt and Camille Saint-Saëns played the original 5,000 pipe organ built in 1859. A new mechanical organ with 63 voices and 4 manuals was built in 1996 by the German firm Jehmlich Orgelbau Dresden GmbH. One of the most daring concerts in the Synagogue's history was in 2002, played by the legendary organ virtuoso Xaver Varnus. Four hours before the concert even standing places could hardly be found in the Synagogue, and 7,200 people were sitting and standing to listen to the legendary improvisor’s fiendish virtuosity.
    Mot clé = A zsinagóga belseje | Niveau = 24

  • [30] Budapest: Vajdahunyad vára
    21/06/18 01:06 Vajdahunyad Castle Vajdahunyad Castle (Hungarian: Vajdahunyad vára) is a castle in the City Park of Budapest, Hungary. It was built between 1896 and 1908 as part of the Millennial Exhibition which celebrated the 1000 years of Hungary since the Hungarian Conquest of the Carpathian Basin in 895. The castle was designed by Ignác Alpár to feature copies of several landmark buildings from different parts the Kingdom of Hungary, especially the Hunyad Castle in Transylvania (now in Romania). As the castle contains parts of buildings from various time periods, it displays different architectural styles: Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque. Originally it was made from cardboard and wood, but it became so popular that it was rebuilt from stone and brick between 1904 and 1908. Today it houses the Agricultural Museum of Hungary, the biggest agricultural museum in Europe. The statue of Anonymus is also displayed in the castle court. Anonymus lived in the 12th century (his true identity is unknown, but he was a notary of Béla III of Hungary), who wrote the chronicle Gesta Hungarorum (Deeds of the Hungarians). The castle also contains a statue of Béla Lugosi. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Budapest: Vajdahunyad vára | Niveau = 25

  • [31] Széchenyi thermal bath seen from the city park
    01/06/18 01:06 Széchenyi thermal bath The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (IPA: [seːtʃeːɲi], Hungarian: Széchenyi-gyógyfürdő) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. Its water is supplied by two thermal springs, their temperature is 74 °C (165 °F) and 77 °C (171 °F), respectively. Components of the thermal water include sulphate, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate and a significant amount of fluoride acid and metaboric acid. Medical indications are on degenerative joint illnesses, chronic and sub-acute joint inflammations, as well as orthopaedic and traumatological post-treatments. History The bath can be found in the City Park, and was built in 1913 in Neo-baroque style to the design of Győző Czigler. The construction of the bath began on 7 May 1909. Designed by architect Eugene Schmitterer, The bath, named in the news as the Artesian spa, opened on 16 June 1913. The name of bath had been Széchenyi spa. The pool construction cost approximately 3.9 million Austro-Hungarian korona. The built-up area was 6,220 square meter. The attendance of spa was in excess of 200,000 people in 1913. (This number was already 890,507 in 1919). At that time it had private baths, separate men and women steam-bath sections, and different men / women "public baths". The complex was expanded in 1927, and it still has 3 outdoor and 15 indoor pools. After its expansion, the thermal artesian well could not fulfill its purpose, so a new well was drilled. The second thermal spring was found in 1938. The depth of the thermal spring is 1256m, the temperature is 77 °C and it supplies 6.000.000 litres (1 585 032 US gallons) of hot water daily. Between 1999 and 2009 the full reformation of the Széchenyi thermal bath took place within the confines of a blanket reconstruction. Main swimming and thermal sections are possible to visit mixed. The bath was named after István Széchenyi. Units In the baths there are pools of varying temperature. The outdoor pools (swimming pool, adventure pool and thermal sitting pool) are 27- 38°C. The swimming pool's depth is 0.8 - 1.7 m. The adventure pool's depth is 0.8 m. Guests can use the water streaming, whirlpool and massaging water beamand. The indoor pools are 27°C. The complex also includes saunas and steam. Massage services are available. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Széchenyi thermal bath seen from the city park | Niveau = 26

  • [32] Széchenyi thermal bath, the coupole
    12/06/18 01:06 Széchenyi thermal bath The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (IPA: [seːtʃeːɲi], Hungarian: Széchenyi-gyógyfürdő) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. Its water is supplied by two thermal springs, their temperature is 74 °C (165 °F) and 77 °C (171 °F), respectively. Components of the thermal water include sulphate, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate and a significant amount of fluoride acid and metaboric acid. Medical indications are on degenerative joint illnesses, chronic and sub-acute joint inflammations, as well as orthopaedic and traumatological post-treatments. History The bath can be found in the City Park, and was built in 1913 in Neo-baroque style to the design of Győző Czigler. The construction of the bath began on 7 May 1909. Designed by architect Eugene Schmitterer, The bath, named in the news as the Artesian spa, opened on 16 June 1913. The name of bath had been Széchenyi spa. The pool construction cost approximately 3.9 million Austro-Hungarian korona. The built-up area was 6,220 square meter. The attendance of spa was in excess of 200,000 people in 1913. (This number was already 890,507 in 1919). At that time it had private baths, separate men and women steam-bath sections, and different men / women "public baths". The complex was expanded in 1927, and it still has 3 outdoor and 15 indoor pools. After its expansion, the thermal artesian well could not fulfill its purpose, so a new well was drilled. The second thermal spring was found in 1938. The depth of the thermal spring is 1256m, the temperature is 77 °C and it supplies 6.000.000 litres (1 585 032 US gallons) of hot water daily. Between 1999 and 2009 the full reformation of the Széchenyi thermal bath took place within the confines of a blanket reconstruction. Main swimming and thermal sections are possible to visit mixed. The bath was named after István Széchenyi. Units In the baths there are pools of varying temperature. The outdoor pools (swimming pool, adventure pool and thermal sitting pool) are 27- 38°C. The swimming pool's depth is 0.8 - 1.7 m. The adventure pool's depth is 0.8 m. Guests can use the water streaming, whirlpool and massaging water beamand. The indoor pools are 27°C. The complex also includes saunas and steam. Massage services are available. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Széchenyi thermal bath, the coupole | Niveau = 27

  • [33] Széchenyi Thermal Bath and Swimming Pool
    07/06/18 01:06 Széchenyi thermal bath The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (IPA: [seːtʃeːɲi], Hungarian: Széchenyi-gyógyfürdő) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. Its water is supplied by two thermal springs, their temperature is 74 °C (165 °F) and 77 °C (171 °F), respectively. Components of the thermal water include sulphate, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate and a significant amount of fluoride acid and metaboric acid. Medical indications are on degenerative joint illnesses, chronic and sub-acute joint inflammations, as well as orthopaedic and traumatological post-treatments. History The bath can be found in the City Park, and was built in 1913 in Neo-baroque style to the design of Győző Czigler. The construction of the bath began on 7 May 1909. Designed by architect Eugene Schmitterer, The bath, named in the news as the Artesian spa, opened on 16 June 1913. The name of bath had been Széchenyi spa. The pool construction cost approximately 3.9 million Austro-Hungarian korona. The built-up area was 6,220 square meter. The attendance of spa was in excess of 200,000 people in 1913. (This number was already 890,507 in 1919). At that time it had private baths, separate men and women steam-bath sections, and different men / women "public baths". The complex was expanded in 1927, and it still has 3 outdoor and 15 indoor pools. After its expansion, the thermal artesian well could not fulfill its purpose, so a new well was drilled. The second thermal spring was found in 1938. The depth of the thermal spring is 1256m, the temperature is 77 °C and it supplies 6.000.000 litres (1 585 032 US gallons) of hot water daily. Between 1999 and 2009 the full reformation of the Széchenyi thermal bath took place within the confines of a blanket reconstruction. Main swimming and thermal sections are possible to visit mixed. The bath was named after István Széchenyi. Units In the baths there are pools of varying temperature. The outdoor pools (swimming pool, adventure pool and thermal sitting pool) are 27- 38°C. The swimming pool's depth is 0.8 - 1.7 m. The adventure pool's depth is 0.8 m. Guests can use the water streaming, whirlpool and massaging water beamand. The indoor pools are 27°C. The complex also includes saunas and steam. Massage services are available. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Széchenyi Thermal Bath and Swimming Pool | Niveau = 28

  • [34] Magyar Állami Operaház [8mm version]
    10/06/18 01:06 Hungarian State Opera House The Hungarian State Opera House (Hungarian: Magyar Állami Operaház) is a neo-Renaissance opera house located in central Budapest, on Andrássy út. It is home to the Budapest Opera Ball, a society event dating back to 1886. Before the closure of "Népszínház" in Budapest, it was the second largest opera building in Budapest. Today it is the largest Opera building in Budapest and Hungary. History Designed by Miklós Ybl, a major figure of 19th century Hungarian architecture, the construction lasted from 1875 to 1884 and was funded by the city of Budapest and by Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary. The Hungarian Royal Opera House (as it was known then) opened to the public on the September 27, 1884. Many important artists were guests here including Gustav Mahler the composer who was director in Budapest from 1887 to 1891 and Otto Klemperer who was music director for three years from 1947 to 1950. In the 1970s the state of the building prompted the Hungarian State to order a major renovation which eventually began in 1980 and lasted till 1984. The reopening was held exactly 100 years after the original opening, on the September 27, 1984. Overview It is a richly-decorated building and is considered one of the architect's masterpieces. It was built in neo-Renaissance style, with elements of Baroque. Ornamentation includes paintings and sculptures by leading figures of Hungarian art including Bertalan Székely, Mór Than and Károly Lotz. Although in size and capacity it is not among the greatest, in beauty and the quality of acoustics the Budapest Opera House is considered to be amongst the finest opera houses in the world. The auditorium holds 1261 seats. It is horseshoe shaped and – according to measurements done in the 1970s by a group of international engineers – has the third best acoustics in Europe after La Scala in Milan and the Palais Garnier in Paris. Although many opera houses have been built since, the Budapest Opera House is still among the best in terms of the acoustics. In front of the building are statues of Ferenc Erkel and Franz Liszt. Liszt is the best known Hungarian composer. Erkel composed the Hungarian national anthem, and was the first music director of the Opera House; he was also founder of the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra. Each year the season lasts from September to the end of June and besides opera performances the Opera House is home to the Hungarian National Ballet. The secondary building of the Hungarian State Opera is Erkel theatre. It is a much larger building that also hosts opera and ballet performances during the opera season. There are guided tours in the building in six languages (English, German, Spanish, French, Italian and Hungarian) almost every day. Features Facade: The decoration of the symmetrical façade follows a musical theme. In niches on either side of the main entrance there are figures of two of Hungary's most prominent composers, Ferenc Erkel and Franz Liszt. Both were sculpted by Alajos Stróbl. Murals: The vaulted ceiling of the foyer is covered in magnificent murals by Bertalan Székely and Mór Than. They depict the nine Muses. Foyer: The foyer, with its marble columns, gilded vaulted ceiling, murals and chandeliers, gives the State Opera House a feeling of opulence and grandeur. Main Entrance: Wrought-iron lamps illuminate the wide stone staircase and the main entrance. Main Staircase: Going to the opera was a great social occasion in the 19th century. A vast, sweeping staircase was an important element of the opera house as it allowed ladies to show off their new gowns. Interior, Hungarian State Opera House Chandelier: The mail hall is decorated with a bronze chandelier the weighs 3050 kg! It illuminates a magnificent fresco by Károly Lotz, of the Greek gods on Olympus. Central Stage: This proscenium arch stage employed the most modern technology of the time. It featured a revolving stage and metal hydraulic machinery. Royal Box: The royal box is located centrally in the three-storey circle. It is decorated with sculptures symbolizing the four operatic voices - soprano, alto, tenor and bass. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Magyar Állami Operaház [8mm version] | Niveau = 29

  • [35] Magyar Állami Operaház [16mm version]
    09/06/18 01:06 Hungarian State Opera House The Hungarian State Opera House (Hungarian: Magyar Állami Operaház) is a neo-Renaissance opera house located in central Budapest, on Andrássy út. It is home to the Budapest Opera Ball, a society event dating back to 1886. Before the closure of "Népszínház" in Budapest, it was the second largest opera building in Budapest. Today it is the largest Opera building in Budapest and Hungary. History Designed by Miklós Ybl, a major figure of 19th century Hungarian architecture, the construction lasted from 1875 to 1884 and was funded by the city of Budapest and by Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary. The Hungarian Royal Opera House (as it was known then) opened to the public on the September 27, 1884. Many important artists were guests here including Gustav Mahler the composer who was director in Budapest from 1887 to 1891 and Otto Klemperer who was music director for three years from 1947 to 1950. In the 1970s the state of the building prompted the Hungarian State to order a major renovation which eventually began in 1980 and lasted till 1984. The reopening was held exactly 100 years after the original opening, on the September 27, 1984. Overview It is a richly-decorated building and is considered one of the architect's masterpieces. It was built in neo-Renaissance style, with elements of Baroque. Ornamentation includes paintings and sculptures by leading figures of Hungarian art including Bertalan Székely, Mór Than and Károly Lotz. Although in size and capacity it is not among the greatest, in beauty and the quality of acoustics the Budapest Opera House is considered to be amongst the finest opera houses in the world. The auditorium holds 1261 seats. It is horseshoe shaped and – according to measurements done in the 1970s by a group of international engineers – has the third best acoustics in Europe after La Scala in Milan and the Palais Garnier in Paris. Although many opera houses have been built since, the Budapest Opera House is still among the best in terms of the acoustics. In front of the building are statues of Ferenc Erkel and Franz Liszt. Liszt is the best known Hungarian composer. Erkel composed the Hungarian national anthem, and was the first music director of the Opera House; he was also founder of the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra. Each year the season lasts from September to the end of June and besides opera performances the Opera House is home to the Hungarian National Ballet. The secondary building of the Hungarian State Opera is Erkel theatre. It is a much larger building that also hosts opera and ballet performances during the opera season. There are guided tours in the building in six languages (English, German, Spanish, French, Italian and Hungarian) almost every day. Features Facade: The decoration of the symmetrical façade follows a musical theme. In niches on either side of the main entrance there are figures of two of Hungary's most prominent composers, Ferenc Erkel and Franz Liszt. Both were sculpted by Alajos Stróbl. Murals: The vaulted ceiling of the foyer is covered in magnificent murals by Bertalan Székely and Mór Than. They depict the nine Muses. Foyer: The foyer, with its marble columns, gilded vaulted ceiling, murals and chandeliers, gives the State Opera House a feeling of opulence and grandeur. Main Entrance: Wrought-iron lamps illuminate the wide stone staircase and the main entrance. Main Staircase: Going to the opera was a great social occasion in the 19th century. A vast, sweeping staircase was an important element of the opera house as it allowed ladies to show off their new gowns. Interior, Hungarian State Opera House Chandelier: The mail hall is decorated with a bronze chandelier the weighs 3050 kg! It illuminates a magnificent fresco by Károly Lotz, of the Greek gods on Olympus. Central Stage: This proscenium arch stage employed the most modern technology of the time. It featured a revolving stage and metal hydraulic machinery. Royal Box: The royal box is located centrally in the three-storey circle. It is decorated with sculptures symbolizing the four operatic voices - soprano, alto, tenor and bass. Source: Wikipedia Camera Nikon D7000 Exposure 0.003 sec (1/400) Aperture f/5.6 Focal Length 16 mm ISO Speed 100
    Mot clé = Magyar Állami Operaház [16mm version] | Niveau = 30

  • [36] Ready to leave the shelter
    22/06/18 01:06 Game atmosphere test, fallout style.
    Mot clé = Ready to leave the shelter | Niveau = 31

  • [37] Lever de soleil sur le pont Long Biên à Hanoï
    31/05/18 01:06 Situé sur la ligne de chemin de fer qui relie Ho Chi Minh Ville à Hanoï, le pont Long Biên est une structure métallique de style Eiffel qui permet le franchissement du fleuve rouge à la sortie d'Hanoï. Construit 1902 (pendant l'indochine française), il aura souffert lors des bombardements lors de la guerre du Viêt Nam. La photo est prise depuis le pont Cầu Chương Dương lors du trajet vers Sapa et Lào Cai à la frontière Chinoise.
    Mot clé = Lever de soleil sur le pont Long Biên à Hanoï | Niveau = 32

28 articles

 

Document créé le 13/03/10 02:52, dernière modification le 13/07/18 16:06
Source du document imprimé : https://www.gaudry.be/tagcloud-rf-style.html

L'infobrol est un site personnel dont le contenu n'engage que moi. Le texte est mis à disposition sous licence CreativeCommons(BY-NC-SA). Plus d'info sur les conditions d'utilisation et sur l'auteur.