11 pages, 10 articles pour «mobile»

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11 pages

  • Test road on the roof - back side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [1] 15/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 02/09/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 11

  • Test road on the roof - street side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [2] 13/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 01/09/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 12

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [3] 04/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 28/08/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 13

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [4] 01/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 26/08/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 14

  • Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [5] 10/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 31/08/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 15

  • Un autre monde
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [6] 03/09/2020 - Dernière modification le 12/09/2020 Un mur décrépi; les lézardes du temps ; presque une peinture abstraite… J’avais choisi cette photo pour illustrer la couverture d’une publication à tirage limité qui présentait certaines de mes photos de lieux abandonnés. Ayant grandi à côté d’une ferme abandonnée dont les vergers étaient remplis de carcasses d’anciennes automobiles ensevelies sous la végétation, ces lieux ont été une source d’explorations et d’aventures diverses avec mes frères. Quel riche terrain de jeu nous avons eu, et que d’aventures nous avons vécu en ces lieux… Vous trouverez un peu tout et n’importe quoi parmi mes photos, principalement des souvenirs de voyages, mais cette photo reste toujours la photo d’accueil, la première du flux. Même si les lieux en friche ne constituent qu’une infime minorité parmi les photos visibles ici, la nature tient toujours une place prépondérante.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 16

  • Volkswagen Bus Toy
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [7] 09/09/2012 - Dernière modification le 10/09/2020 I immediately fell in love with this Volkswagen Bus when Nath brought it from holiday This bus was also called: - Volkswagen Bus - Volkswagen Transporter - Volkswagen Kombi - Hippie Bus - Hippie Van - "Hippiemobile" - "hippie-hauler"
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 17

  • Flakpanzer Gepard
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [8] 31/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 10/09/2020 The Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard ("anti-aircraft cannon tank Cheetah", better known as the Flakpanzer Gepard) is an autonomous, all-weather-capable German self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG). It was developed in the 1960s and fielded in the 1970s, and has been upgraded several times with the latest electronics. It constituted a cornerstone of the air defence of the German Army (Bundeswehr) and a number of other NATO countries. In Germany, the Gepard was phased out in late 2010 to be replaced by "SysFla", a mobile and stationary air defence system using the LFK NG missile and the new MANTIS gun system. The mobile platform of SysFla will likely be based on the GTK Boxer. Source : Wikipedia
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 18

  • Jagdpanzer Kanone Jpz 4-53
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [9] 22/08/2020 - Dernière modification le 06/09/2020 Kanonenjagdpanzer The Kanonenjagdpanzer 4 - 5 (also known as Jagdpanzer Kanone 90mm, or tank destroyer, gun) was a German Cold War tank destroyer equipped with a 90mm anti-tank gun from obsolete M47 Patton tanks. Its design was very similar to that of the World War II Jagdpanzer IV. History The first prototypes of the Kanonenjagdpanzer were built in 1960 by Hanomag and Henschel for West Germany and by MOWAG for Switzerland. Hanomag and Henschel continued to produce prototypes, until between 1966 and 1967, 770 were built for the Bundeswehr, 385 by Hanomag and 385 by Henschel. Eighty of them were delivered to Belgium from April 1975 onward. When the Soviets began deploying their T-64 and T-72 main battle tanks, the 90 mm gun wasn't capable of ensuring long-range combat and the Kanonenjagdpanzer became obsolete. Although the producers claimed it could be rearmed with a 105 mm gun, between 1983 and 1985, 163 of these tank destroyers were converted into Raketenjagdpanzer Jaguar 2 anti-tank guided missile carriers by removing the gun, adding a roof-mounted TOW missile launcher and fastening further spaced and perforated armour on the hull. Some others were refitted by removing the main gun into artillery observation vehicles, so called Beobachtungspanzer, which served most particularly in the mortar units. Some Kanonenjagdpanzer remained into service with the Heimatschutztruppe until 1990. Design The Kanonenjagdpanzer was a highly mobile vehicle, its survivability based on its mobility and its low profile. Its hull consisted of welded steel, which had a maximum thickness of only 50 mm. It carried a crew of four, a commander, driver, gunner and a loader. Since the Kanonenjagdpanzer followed the casemate design of most World War II tank destroyers, the gun was fixed within the casemate, located a little right from the center. The 90 mm gun could only traverse 15° to the sides and elevate from -8° to +15°. It carried 51 90 mm rounds for the main gun and 4000 7,62 mm rounds for the two MG3s. The Kanonenjagdpanzer had NBC protection and night-fighting ability. Source : Wikipedia In the left background, we can see a GFM cloche made by Cockerill in the year 1935. It was a fixed and non-retractable firing position made of a 20 tons thick iron casting which shielded its occupant. GFM is an acronym for Guetteur et Fusil-Mitrailleur, (lookout and rifle-machine-gunner), which describes its purpose as a lookout and firing position for light weapons.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 19

  • Devoxx 2014 - Easily Creating Beautiful Web Apps with Polymer and Paper Elements.
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [10] 12/11/2014 - Dernière modification le 09/08/2020 Easily Creating Beautiful Web Apps with Polymer and Paper Elements. Web Components usher in a new era of web development based on encapsulated and interoperable custom elements that extend HTML itself. Built atop these new standards, Polymer makes it easier and faster to create anything from a button to a complete application across desktop, mobile, and beyond. In this talk, you'll learn how to build your own HTML elements and use Google's new material design elements. Create beautiful sites and apps with a unified look and feel for mobile, desktop, and everything in between. Source: DEVOXX. A demonstration that had only one default: giving me more desire to work with these components
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 20

  • Coucher de soleil sur les anciens minibus VW
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [11] 07/01/2020 - Dernière modification le 28/08/2020 Je passe tous les jours devant en allant travailler; un soir au retour je n'ai pu résister à l'envie de les prendre en photo... Les VW T1 Dormobile (ceux avec le double pare-brise avant) et les T2 étaient synonymes de rêves de liberté, et l'aménagement Westfalia était vraiment bien conçu pour l'époque. J'adorais leurs formes arrondies avant les modèles plus anguleux des T3 (les T1 et T2 semblaient inspirés par la VW coccinelle, alors que les suivants héritaient plus du design de la Golf). Depuis l'intérêt manifesté par les hipsters, le prix de ces antiquités est malheureusement devenu presque indécent.
    Mot clé = mobile (titre ou description) | Niveau = 21

10 articles

Document créé le 13/03/2010, dernière modification le 26/09/2019
Source du document imprimé : https://www.gaudry.be/tagcloud-rf-mobile.html

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