15 pages pour «addition»

Vous pouvez consulter la page d'explications relative au nuage de mots clés et aux techniques utilisées.

15 pages

  • [1] Exemples
    19/03/2002 Multiplication par additions, etc.
    Mot clé = addition | Niveau = 2

  • [2] Le demi-additionneur
    19/03/2002 Le demi-additionneur: principe d’addition, table de vérité, circuit logique.
    Mot clé = addition | Niveau = 2

  • [3] Micro instructions
    08/02/2004 Micro instructions et micro programmes : exemple d’addition et de multiplication.
    Mot clé = architecture | Niveau = 4

  • [4] Formules
    11/04/2003 Les formules de MS Excel
    Mot clé = addition | Niveau = 5

  • [5] Flight Forum
    10/04/2019 A strategic business location in the heart of Europe Business park Flight Forum is strategically situated close to Eindhoven Airport with easy access to the rest of the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the rest of Europe. Business park Flight Forum Flight Forum is a high quality, mixed business park at Eindhoven Airport. It covers an area of 65 hectares and comprises an office cluster with parcels for 20 to 25 independent office premises, ranging in size from 2,500 to 10,000 m2 gfa. In addition, five commercial clusters are being developed measuring 270,000m2 that will provide 175.000m2 of warehouse space. Around 40% of the plan has already been completed.
    Mot clé = Flight Forum | Niveau = 11

  • [6] Flight Forum Reflection
    30/03/2019 A strategic business location in the heart of Europe Business park Flight Forum is strategically situated close to Eindhoven Airport with easy access to the rest of the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and the rest of Europe. Business park Flight Forum Flight Forum is a high quality, mixed business park at Eindhoven Airport. It covers an area of 65 hectares and comprises an office cluster with parcels for 20 to 25 independent office premises, ranging in size from 2,500 to 10,000 m2 gfa. In addition, five commercial clusters are being developed measuring 270,000m2 that will provide 175.000m2 of warehouse space. Around 40% of the plan has already been completed.
    Mot clé = Flight Forum Reflection | Niveau = 12

  • [7] Test road on the roof - back side
    20/03/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Test road on the roof - back side | Niveau = 13

  • [8] Test road on the roof - street side
    18/03/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Test road on the roof - street side | Niveau = 14

  • [9] Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant
    09/03/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant | Niveau = 15

  • [10] Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière
    06/03/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière | Niveau = 16

  • [11] Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse
    15/03/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse | Niveau = 17

  • [12] Devoxx - JavaFx devices - preparation
    16/03/2019 JavaFX Bootstrap by Jim Weaver and Gerrit Grunwald Much of this session will draw upon the work in the Pro JavaFX 2 book that Jim Weaver co-authored, as well as the UI controls and gauges that Gerrit Grunwald created for the open source JFXtras project. Some of the areas that we'll cover are: Getting started with JavaFX Creating a user interface Using Scene Builder and FXML Using the JavaFX UI controls Creating custom UI controls Leveraging the strengths of JavaFX and HTML5 Overview of DataFX, calling web services Using Scenic View Using JavaFX APIs from Alternative JVM Languages Embedded Java/JavaFX on a Raspberry Pi Embedded Java/JavaFX on a BeagleBoard Wrap-up and additional Q&A During the session we'll have brief guest appearances by JavaFX developers such as Martin Gunnarson and Pär Sikö, Stephen Chin, Angela Caicedo, Jonathan Giles, Johan Vos, and Jasper Potts. We'll also be awarding ten copies of the Pro JavaFX 2 book to participative audience members. Source: Devoxx
    Mot clé = Devoxx - JavaFx devices - preparation | Niveau = 18

  • [13] Devoxx - JavaFX Bootstrap
    28/03/2019 JavaFX Bootstrap by Jim Weaver and Gerrit Grunwald Much of this session will draw upon the work in the Pro JavaFX 2 book that Jim Weaver co-authored, as well as the UI controls and gauges that Gerrit Grunwald created for the open source JFXtras project. Some of the areas that we'll cover are: Getting started with JavaFX Creating a user interface Using Scene Builder and FXML Using the JavaFX UI controls Creating custom UI controls Leveraging the strengths of JavaFX and HTML5 Overview of DataFX, calling web services Using Scenic View Using JavaFX APIs from Alternative JVM Languages Embedded Java/JavaFX on a Raspberry Pi Embedded Java/JavaFX on a BeagleBoard Wrap-up and additional Q&A During the session we'll have brief guest appearances by JavaFX developers such as Martin Gunnarson and Pär Sikö, Stephen Chin, Angela Caicedo, Jonathan Giles, Johan Vos, and Jasper Potts. We'll also be awarding ten copies of the Pro JavaFX 2 book to participative audience members. Source: Devoxx
    Mot clé = Devoxx - JavaFX Bootstrap | Niveau = 19

  • [14] Armored personnel carrier M75
    24/03/2019 M75, armored personnel carrier The M75 is an American armored personnel carrier that was produced between December 1952 and February 1954, and saw service in the Korean War. It was replaced in U.S. service by the smaller, cheaper, amphibious M59. The M75s were given as military aid to Belgium, where they were used until the early 1980s. 1,729 M75s were built before production was halted. Description The M75 has a welded steel hull, which varies in thickness from 1 inch (2.5 cm) to 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) with a line of sight thickness on the front hull of between 1.6 inches (4 cm) and 2 inches (5 cm). Fully loaded, the vehicle weighed approximately 42,000 pounds (19,051 kg). The M75 has an almost identical layout to later U.S. armored personnel carriers: the driver sits in the front left of the hull, with the air-cooled six-cylinder horizontally opposed Continental AO-895-4 gasoline engine to his right. The driver is provided with an M19 infra-red night vision periscope in later models and four M17 periscopes. Behind the driver and engine, in the center of the vehicle, sits the commander, who is provided with six vision blocks around his hatch. The commander has a cupola that was normally fitted with an M2 machine gun, for which 1,800 rounds were carried in the vehicle. The infantry sat behind the commander in a large compartment. Additionally, an M20 Super Bazooka was carried along with 10 rockets, and 180 rounds of ammunition for an M1 or M2 carbine. The engine developed a maximum of around 295 horsepower (220 kW) at 2,660 rpm, giving the vehicle a top speed of 43 mph (69 km/h). The vehicle carried 150 US gallons (568 L) of gasoline, giving it a road range of around 115 miles (185 km). It has five road wheels and three return rollers on each side. Source : Wikipedia
    Mot clé = Armored personnel carrier M75 | Niveau = 20

  • [15] Devoxx 2015
    11/04/2019 The Devoxx family welcomes annually 10.500 Devoxxians spread across Antwerp, Paris, London, Krakow and Casablanca. In addition Devoxx4Kids brings coding magic to 5,000+ children through chapters all over the world. Devoxx Belgium 2015 is from Mon. 9th until Fri. 13th November. Website : www.devoxx.be/
    Mot clé = Devoxx 2015 | Niveau = 21

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Document créé le 13/03/2010, dernière modification le 26/10/2018
Source du document imprimé : https://www.gaudry.be/tagcloud-rf-addition.html

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