32 pages, 2 articles pour «search»

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32 pages

  • [1] Moteur de recherche
    19/03/02 23:41 Moteur de recherche interne. Vous pouvez chercher des définitions dans le dictionnaire, chercher des pages, chercher des articles dans les astuces ou les ac
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 1

  • [2] AddressStringTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.AddressStringTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [3] AddressTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.AddressTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [4] AndTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.AndTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [5] BodyTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.BodyTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [6] ComparisonTerm
    24/12/07 00:38 javax.mail.search.ComparisonTerm Les API Java 1.5 du site de sun. En anglais...
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [7] DateTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.DateTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [8] FlagTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.FlagTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [9] FromStringTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.FromStringTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [10] FromTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.FromTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [11] HeaderTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.HeaderTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [12] IntegerComparisonTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.IntegerComparisonTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [13] javax.mail.search
    07/10/07 21:42 javax.mail.search Les API Java 1.5 du site de sun. En anglais...
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [14] MessageIDTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.MessageIDTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [15] MessageNumberTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.MessageNumberTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [16] NotTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.NotTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [17] OrTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.OrTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [18] ReceivedDateTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.ReceivedDateTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [19] RecipientStringTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.RecipientStringTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [20] RecipientTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.RecipientTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [21] SearchException
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.SearchException
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [22] SearchTerm
    19/04/08 22:16 javax.mail.search.SearchTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [23] SentDateTerm
    19/04/08 22:17 javax.mail.search.SentDateTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [24] SizeTerm
    19/04/08 22:17 javax.mail.search.SizeTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [25] StringTerm
    19/04/08 22:17 javax.mail.search.StringTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [26] SubjectTerm
    19/04/08 22:17 javax.mail.search.SubjectTerm
    Mot clé = search | Niveau = 2

  • [27] Test road on the roof - back side
    13/06/18 20:12 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Test road on the roof - back side | Niveau = 11

  • [28] Test road on the roof - street side
    11/06/18 20:12 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Test road on the roof - street side | Niveau = 12

  • [29] Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant
    02/06/18 20:12 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant | Niveau = 13

  • [30] Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière
    30/05/18 20:12 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière | Niveau = 14

  • [31] Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse
    08/06/18 20:12 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse | Niveau = 15

  • [32] Des hommes comme vous et moi
    18/06/18 20:12 The museum Ramioul: The museum is designed to encourage visitors not to look at prehistory from the outside but rather to make him live it by experiencing the sensations of prehistoric man. The exhibition collections refuses to privilege the public scholar, it aims instead to familiarize the visitor with prehistoric life itself rather than with the representation given by the Archaeology. The chronology is not the main theme of the course. The museum is structured according to themes of prehistoric life in order to create a genuine relationship between the daily life of the visitor and that of prehistoric man. For this purpose, the concept expographique refers to his daily life, in a participatory approach and a variety of scenic resources: interactive terminals, multimedia projections, reconstructions, facsimiles to handle, ... The cave Ramioul: The cave Ramioul is a treasure of natural heritage and archaeological Walloon. It is a listed site of the Walloon Region. Discoveries that were made and the beauty of its concretions make it unavoidable. Cave Ramioul extends to within one kilometer of the cave Engis which were discovered in 1829, the first Neanderthal fossils in the world. "Chercheurs de la Wallonie" fought for many years to preserve it, and it narrowly escaped the shots backhoe. Since its inception, Prehistoric - Museum of Prehistory in Wallonia, has made every effort to conserve, preserve and enhance this jewel stone and its biodiversity. The upper level of the cave has archaeological interest. The terrace was cleared in progressively different excavations. In October 1908, A. Vandebosch and her team of "Chercheurs de la Wallonie" discover the Neolithic ossuary of "triangular cave" that overlooks the terrace of the cave when masked by sediments. Shards of pottery, faunal remains, some stone tools and numerous body parts belonging to seven children and dated + / -2750 years BC have been unearthed. Continued excavations beneath the ossuary and the release of the entry in 1911, leading the researchers to explore the cave itself. It delivers the tools belonging to Palaeolithic industries as well as faunal remains of now extinct species (bear, lion, cave hyaena, wolf, woolly rhinoceros, mammoth). On the terrace, two archaeological layers were identified. The first was attributed to the Upper Palaeolithic to Aurigacien (+ / - 30000ans BC) and contains various tools slide and faunal remains consumed. The second oldest (+ / - 70000ans BC), contains tools and Middle Paleolithic characteristics attributed to Keilmessergruppen (Neanderthal). Cave Ramioul contributes to the dialogue between past and present. She is behind the Museum of Prehistory in Wallonia and participates in the ongoing dialogue established between the prehistoric sites of excavation, the archaeological material and the public. Source: www.ramioul.org
    Mot clé = Des hommes comme vous et moi | Niveau = 16

2 articles

  • [1] Personnaliser sa page 404 sous Wordpress
    12/03/15 02:38 Profiter de la page 404 (qui s'affiche lorsqu'une page n'est pas trouvée) pour en tirer avantage. Modifier la page 404 avec les marqueurs conditionnels.

  • [2] La légia
    31/03/15 05:07 Visite thématique à Liège par Joseph Deleuse sur le parcours de la Légia

 

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