13 pages pour «cupi»

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13 pages

  • P-code
    https://www.gaudry.be > Programmation > Compilateur
    [1] 31/07/2010 - Dernière modification le 28/10/2018 Pcode généré par le compilateur pour le langage LSD, et la GPMachine
    Mot clé = cupi | Niveau = 2

  • Vesteda tower
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [2] 09/07/2011 - Dernière modification le 11/10/2019 The Vesteda tower is located in Eindhoven and was finished in 2006. This tower refers back to the Flatiron building (in Manhattan, New York City) of 1902 with its distinct shape. One of the main differences being the diamond shape of the former, whereas the latter is more like a triangle. At 90 meters tall it is the fourth tallest building in Eindhoven. 23 Of its 27 floors above ground (thus 28 floors for the total) are occupied by two luxury apartments per floor, the top floor being home to a penthouse. The third floor is home to a health club and a guest house and the bottom floors are the main entrance and Vesteda gallery.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 11

  • Test road on the roof - back side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [3] 13/09/2019 - Dernière modification le 01/10/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 12

  • Test road on the roof - street side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [4] 11/09/2019 - Dernière modification le 30/09/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 13

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [5] 02/09/2019 - Dernière modification le 26/09/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 14

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [6] 30/08/2019 - Dernière modification le 24/09/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 15

  • Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [7] 08/09/2019 - Dernière modification le 29/09/2019 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 16

  • Istanbul, Topkapi palace - Imperial Council (Defterhāne)
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [8] 22/02/2012 - Dernière modification le 19/09/2019 Defterhāne This picture shows the third chamber called Defterhāne. Imperial Council The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building is the chamber in which the ministers of state, council ministers (Dîvân Heyeti), the Imperial Council, consisting of the Grand Vizier (Paşa Kapısı), viziers, and other leading officials of the Ottoman state, held meetings. It is also called Kubbealtı, which means "under the dome", in reference to the dome in the council main hall. It is situated in the northwestern corner of the courtyard next to the Gate of Felicity. The first Council chambers in the palace were built during the reign of Mehmed II, and the present building dates from the period of Süleyman the Magnificent by the chief architect Alseddin. It has since undergone several changes, was much damaged and restored after the Harem fire of 1665, and according to the entrance inscription it was also restored during the periods of Selim III and Mahmud II. From the 18th century onwards, the place began to lose its original importance, as state administration was gradually transferred to the Sublime Porte (Bâb-ı Âli) of the Grand Viziers. The last meeting of the Council in the palace chambers was held on Wednesday, August 30, 1876, when the cabinet (Vükela Heyeti) met to discuss the state of Murat V, who had been indisposed for some time. The council hall has multiple entrances both from inside the palace and from the courtyard. The porch consists of multiple marble and porphyry pillars, with an ornate green and white-coloured wooden ceiling decorated with gold. The floor is covered in marble. The entrances into the hall from outside are in the rococo style, with gilded grills to admit natural light. While the pillars are earlier Ottoman style, the wall paintings and decorations are from the later rococo period. Inside, the Imperial Council building consists of three adjoining main rooms. Two of the three domed chambers of this building open into the porch and the courtyard. The Divanhane, built with a wooden portico at the corner of the Divan Court (Divan Meydani) in the 15th century, was later used as the mosque of the council but was removed in 1916. There are three domed chambers: - The first chamber where the Imperial Council held its deliberations is the Kubbealtı. - The second chamber was occupied by the secretarial staff of the Imperial Divan. - In the adjacent third chamber called Defterhāne (this view) , records were kept by the head clerks. The last room also served as a document archive. On its facade are verse inscriptions, which mention the restoration work carried out in 1792 and 1819, namely under Sultan Selim III and Mahmud II. The rococo decorations on the façade and inside the Imperial Council date from this period. The main chamber Kubbealtı is, however, decorated with Ottoman Kütahya tiles. Three long sofas along the sides were the seats for the officials, with a small hearth in the middle. The small gilded ball that hangs from the ceiling represents the earth. It is placed in front of the sultan's window and symbolizes him dispensing justice to the world, as well as keeping the powers of his viziers in check. In the Imperial Council meetings, the political, administrative and religious affairs of the state and important concerns of the citizens were discussed. The Imperial Council normally met four times a week (Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday) after prayer at dawn. The meetings of the Imperial Council were run according to an elaborate and strict protocol. Council members such as the Grand Vizier, viziers, chief military officials of the Muslim Judiciary (Kazaskers) of Rumelia and Anatolia, the Minister of Finance or heads of the Treasury (defterdar), the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Reis-ül-Küttab) and sometimes the Grand Müfti (Sheikh ül-İslam) met here to discuss and decide the affairs of state. Other officials who were allowed were the Nişancilar secretaries of the Imperial Council and keepers of the royal monogram (tuğra) and the officials charged with the duty of writing official memoranda (Tezkereciler), and the clerks recording the resolutions. From the window with the golden grill, the Sultan or the Valide Sultan was able to follow deliberations of the council without being noticed. The window could be reached from the imperial quarters in the adjacent Tower of Justice (Adalet Kulesi). When the sultan rapped on the grill or drew the red curtain, the Council session was terminated, and the viziers were summoned one by one to the Audience Hall (Arz Odası) to present their reports to the sultan. All the statesmen, apart from the Grand Vizier, performed their dawn prayers in the Hagia Sophia and entered the Imperial Gate according to their rank, passing through the Gate of Salutation and into the divan chamber, where they would wait for the arrival of the Grand Vizier. The Grand Vizier performed his prayers at home, and was accompanied to the palace by his own attendants. On his arrival there, he was given a ceremonial welcome, and before proceeding to the imperial divan, he would approach the Gate of Felicity and salute it as if paying his respects to the gate of the sultan's house. He entered the chamber and took his seat directly under the sultan's window and council commenced. Affairs of the state were generally discussed until noon, when the members of the Council dined in the chambers and after which petitions were heard here. All the members of Ottoman society, men and women of all creeds, were granted a hearing. An important ceremony was held to mark the first Imperial Council of each new Grand Vizier, and also to mark his presentation with the Imperial Seal (Mühr-ü Hümayûn). The most important ceremony took place every three months during the handing out of salaries (ulûfe) to the Janissaries. The reception of foreign dignitaries was normally arranged for the same day, creating an occasion to reflect the wealth and might of the state. Ambassadors were then received by the Grand Vizier in the Council chambers, where a banquet was held in their honour. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - version 10Mar2012 See also in my flickr albums: Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque of Istanbul), Hagia Sophia, the Rüstem Pasha Mosque Camera infos: Camera: Nikon D7000 Lens: Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 EX DC OS Exposure 0.05 sec (1/20) Aperture f/6.3 Focal Length 20 mm ISO Speed 100 Date: February 22, 2012 GPS Latitude 41 deg 0' 45.92" N GPS Longitude 28 deg 59' 1.72" E
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 17

  • Stp Pommern - R501 group shelter
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [9] 07/04/2012 - Dernière modification le 02/10/2019 Stutzpunkt 120 Pommern: KVA occupied by : 331 Inf. Div. 156 Reserve Division 47 Infanterie Division StP. occupied by: 3. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 4. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 B - Stelle 6. / 107 Seenotdienst Wissant Armament: 2 cm Flak S.K.C/30 2.5 cm PaK 112(f) 7.5 F.K. 235 (b) Bunker type: R 501 Gruppenunterstand One of the most frequently built MG – schartenstand. The succesors of the R 105 This bunker was a shelter for a group of 10 men. It consists of an access, an anti airlock gas, a main room (living room), and an emergency exit.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 18

  • Stp Pommern - R630 on the beach
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [10] 07/04/2012 - Dernière modification le 02/10/2019 Stutzpunkt 120 Pommern: KVA occupied by : 331 Inf. Div. 156 Reserve Division 47 Infanterie Division StP. occupied by: 3. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 4. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 B - Stelle 6. / 107 Seenotdienst Wissant Armament: 2 cm Flak S.K.C/30 2.5 cm PaK 112(f) 7.5 F.K. 235 (b) Bunker type: R 630 MG – Schartenstand One of the most frequently built MG – schartenstand. The succesors of the R 105
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 19

  • Stp Pommern - flooded R600
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [11] 07/04/2012 - Dernière modification le 05/10/2019 Stutzpunkt 120 Pommern: KVA occupied by : 331 Inf. Div. 156 Reserve Division 47 Infanterie Division StP. occupied by: 3. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 4. / Reserve Grenadier Regiment 26 B - Stelle 6. / 107 Seenotdienst Wissant Armament: 2 cm Flak S.K.C/30 2.5 cm PaK 112(f) 7.5 F.K. 235 (b) Bunker type: R 600 Geschützstellung für 5 cm KwK Gun emplacement for 5cm KwK at the top.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 20

  • Cowpers HF6
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [12] 05/10/2019 - Dernière modification le 12/10/2019 Cowpers Un cowper moderne consiste en cylindre vertical en acier de 6 à 9 m de diamètre et s'élevant à 20 à 35 m. Cette enceinte est remplie de briques réfractaires dont la nature dépend de leur rôle : on a des briques isolantes qui protègent la face interne du blindage du cowper, et des briques stockant et restituant la chaleur. Ces dernières servent à la construction du puits de combustion, où se déploie la flamme, et du rûchage, un empilement de briques perforées qui absorbe la chaleur des fumées. Le puits est souvent intégré dans le cylindre où il occupe environ un tiers de la section du four. Les plus gros cowpers sont dotés de puits externes qui permettent de mieux isoler la zone de combustion de celle d’accumulation/restitution de chaleur. La chauffe étant plus lente que le refroidissement, chaque haut fourneau est doté de trois, parfois quatre, cowpers passant alternativement dans chaque phase. En fonctionnement continu, un cowper restitue sa chaleur pendant environ 30 min, avant que le vent soit orienté vers le cowper qui vient de finir une réchauffe de 50 min (durée à laquelle il faut ajouter les phases d'inertage et de mise en pression, qui durent 10 min). Un cowper moderne peut réchauffer environ 1,4 tonne de vent à 1 200 °C, par tonne de fonte. Lorsqu’il restitue sa chaleur, c'est donc, pour un haut fourneau produisant 6 000 t de fonte par jour, un four d'une puissance d'environ 100 MW. La chauffe est effectuée par combustion d'une partie du gaz produit par le haut fourneau, qui doit être mélangé avec un gaz riche pour atteindre les températures souhaitées. Source: Wikipedia Modern cowper consists in vertical steel cylinder 6 to 9 m and a diameter amounting to from 20 to 35 m. This enclosure is filled with refractory bricks whose nature depends on their role has insulating bricks that protect the inner face of the shield cowper, and storing and reproducing bricks heat. The latter are used in the construction of wells combustion, where the flame spreads, and rûchage, a stack of perforated bricks which absorbs heat of the fumes. The well is often integrated into the cylinder where it occupies about one third of the furnace section. The biggest feature cowpers outer wells to better isolate the combustion zone of the accumulator / heat delivery. Heating is slower than cooling, each blast furnace has three, sometimes four, stoves passing alternately in each phase. In continuous operation, cowper restores its heat for about 30 minutes before the wind is facing cowper who just finished a 50-minute heats (time at which there are the phases inerting and pressurization, lasting 10 min). Modern cowper can warm wind of about 1.4 tons to 1200 ° C, per ton of pig iron. When the heat returns, so this is for a blast furnace producing 6000 t of pig iron per day, a furnace with a capacity of approximately 100 MW. The heater is powered by combustion of part of the product through the furnace, which must be mixed with the rich gas to achieve the desired gas temperature.
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 21

  • MÁV 424-287
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [13] 04/10/2019 - Dernière modification le 12/10/2019 The red star train graveyard was full of old steam engines, and at least two railcarts that were used to carry jewish prisoners to Auschwitz during occupied Nazi times. I think now actually MAGAV424.287 is fully repaired and functional, and is located in a transport museum. But imagine for a moment the MAGAV424.287 completing the 53 ... The MAGAV424.287 even had at one time two red wings, just above its registration number. This abandoned train was used during communistic times and the red star painted on the front explain why the location was known as the "Red Star train graveyard".
    Mot clé = cupi (titre ou description) | Niveau = 22

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Document créé le 13/03/2010, dernière modification le 26/09/2019
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