10 pages pour «facture»

Vous pouvez consulter la page d'explications relative au nuage de mots clés et aux techniques utilisées.

10 pages

  • PrinterMoreInfoManufacturer
    https://www.gaudry.be > Programmation > API Java
    [1] 07/12/2006 - Dernière modification le 04/06/2020 javax.print.attribute.standard.PrinterMoreInfoManufacturer Les API Java 1.5 du site de sun. En anglais...
    Mot clé = facture | Niveau = 2

  • La tour d'Eben-Ezer
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [2] 21/07/2011 - Dernière modification le 24/05/2020 A Belgian self-built tower inspired by the bible and ancient civilizations. Eben-Ezer Tower is a tower-museum built by Robert Garcet to Eben-Emael (common Bassenge ), north of Liège. Its proportions are based on those of the New Jerusalem , according to John. According to its architect, Robert Garcet , each stone has a revelation and the figures speak for themselves. The building, 33 meters high on a square plan with turret corners, is constructed of large stones of flint on a deep well of 33 meters also. One of the leading manufacturer is Krawinckel Gilbert. Its seven floors are crowned by the four cherubim of the Apocalypse, scupted in stone: Taurus, northwest, man, south-west, Leo, southeast, and the Eagle, the northeast. At the base of the tower, a stone circle draws her twelve pillars between the bushes, each standing stone is distant from each other by 3.33 meters. As for the monumental staircase that runs down the hillside, he, too, the dimensions required by an ancient esoteric . In the Bible, Eben-Ezer is the Stone of help, the memorial stone set up by Samuel after a defeat of the Philistines, as a memorial of the aid received in connection with God (1 Sat 7:7 - 12), near Mizpah (Benjamin), near the western entrance to the pass of Beth-horon. The Tower of Eben-Ezer is a self-built castle constructed in the 1960s by a single man in the isolated Jeker valley of Belgium. The builder, Robert Garcet, was fascinated with the Bible, numerology and ancient civilizations. The entire seven-level tower is built of flint, and according to Garcet, was designed using ancient mystical measurements. On the top of the tower are four giant biblical animals, and the interior is full of Garcet's biblical, archaeological, paleontological and geological art. Even more curious is that although the tower only looks ancient, it sits on top of a vast network of truly ancient tunnels. Garcet claims to have discovered over a hundred "new" fossilized creatures and a 70-million year-old village in the labyrinth of tunnels under the tower! Unfortunately, the village was destroyed by a mining explosion before it could be studied. A new educational space called the Geospadium takes the visitor on a tour of the history and use of the flint stone. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, and Atlas Oscura.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 11

  • Test road on the roof - back side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [3] 29/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 17/05/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 12

  • Test road on the roof - street side
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [4] 27/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 16/05/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 13

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - avant
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [5] 18/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 12/05/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 14

  • Garage Imperia - voiture abandonnée - arrière
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [6] 15/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 10/05/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 15

  • Château Peltzer
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [7] 21/10/2011 - Dernière modification le 26/05/2020 Historique : Les eaux pures de la Vesdre et l’absence de toute contrainte corporatiste avaient attiré de nombreux artisans dans la région de Verviers au XVIII siècle. Peu avant la Révolution française, les manufactures cédèrent progressivement la place à des fabriques plus importantes et les nouveaux capitaines d’industrie cessèrent de faire travailler à domicile les petites mains de Hodimont, Ensival, Dison ou Eupen. Aussi le gros bourg de Verviers devint-il une cité considérable ou affluaient les ouviers des campagnes. En 1810, quatre-vingt-six fabricants verviétois occupaient au moins 25.000 personnes. Parallèlement la Belgique connaissait l’essor du machinisme dont le développement n’avait d’égal dans le monde que celui des grandes agglomérations industrielles du nord de l’Angleterre. En 1785 une famille d’origine rhénane, les Peltzer, vint s’installer dans bourdonnante vallée. Avec les Simonis et les Biolley, les Peltzer furent assez rapidement les rois de la cité lainière. Leur Château de la rue Grétry s’éleva dès 1895 dans un parc valonné qui occupait une situation agréable, loin des fumées et des miasmes des quartiers laborieux. A partir de 1938, à la mort de la veuve du constructeur, ce grand édifice néo-gothique, difficile à entretenir et à chauffer connut des phases de silence et fût même inhabité dès 1971. Aussi Georges Peltzer, par souci de préserver un témoin grandiose de l’histoire de sa famille et de celle du capitalisme wallon, accepta-t-il de se débarrasser du bien en 1993. Source : Guide Castella
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 16

  • Usine Impéria, l'entrée moyenâgeuse
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [8] 24/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 15/05/2020 Imperia Impéria was a Belgian automobile manufactured from 1906 until 1948. Products of the Ateliers Piedboeuf of Liège, the first cars were designed by the German Paul Henze. These were fours of 3, 4.9, and 9.9 liters. /.../ Impéria produced a monobloc 12 hp (8.9 kW) in 1909; in 1910 the company merged with Springuel. The factory producing Impéria-Abadals from about 1916; in 1921, it built three ohc 5·6-liter straight-eights. These were quickly replaced by an ephemeral ohc 3-liter 32-valve four which was capable of going 90 mph (140 km/h). This was followed by an 1100 cc side-valve 11/22 hp four designed by Couchard, one of the first cars ever built with a sunroof. Its engine rotated counter-clockwise, and its transmission brake also served as a servo for those on the front wheels. In 1937 a six of 1624 cc appeared; this had been available in three-carburettor Super Sports form from 1930. Over the course of four years Impéria took over three other Belgian car manufacturers: Métallurgique (1927), Excelsior (1929), and Nagant (1931). From 1934 until the company folded it built mainly front-wheel-drive Adlers with Belgian-made coachwork. The company merged with Minerva in 1934, but they split in 1939. After 1948 Impéria assembled Adlers and Standard Vanguards under license. After Standard decided to set up a new factory in Belgium, the factory was left without work and had to close doors in 1957. In 1925, the company hired Louis de Monge as chief research engineer. Some of his work included torsion bar suspension and automatic transmissions. De Monge left in 1937 to join Ettore Bugatti for whom he would design the Bugatti 100P racer plane. In addition to its production in Belgium, Impéria made a number of cars in Great Britain; these were assembled at a factory in Maidenhead. Rooftop test track Around and on top of the factory buildings, there was a test track over 1km long. The track was built in 1928. The test drivers used the roads of the village, a road with a lot of bends. Speeding and high revving engines made the population mad and they were no longer willing to support the factory. The only solution was to build a test track within the factory and using the football field of the local football club. The ring started within the factory, then over the roof which gave a track of about one kilometre. Only Fiat had a similar track. This little test track became an attraction in the region. A little causeway allowed people to climb onto the nearside hill to watch the spectacle of car testing over the factories roofs. And now Now most of the buildings are occupied by a firm of construction, and a few sheds and batiments are so ruined that the roof risks to collapse. There are still two vehicles (under the dust and the building materials), among which one may be an Imperia model. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 17

  • Antonov An-24 cockpit
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [9] 11/05/2020 - Dernière modification le 23/05/2020 The Antonov An-24 (Ukrainian: Антонов Ан-24) (NATO reporting name: Coke) is a 44-seat twin turboprop transport/passenger aircraft designed in 1957 and manufactured in the Soviet Union by the Antonov Design Bureau. Design and development First flown in 1959, over 1,000 An-24s were built and 880 are still in service worldwide, mostly in the CIS and Africa, with a total of 297 Antonov An-24 aircraft in airline service, as of May 2010. It was designed to replace the veteran piston Ilyushin Il-14 transport on short to medium haul trips, optimised for operating from rough strips and unprepared airports in remote locations. The high-wing layout protects engines and blades from debris, the power-to-weight ratio is higher than that of many comparable aircraft and the machine is rugged, requiring minimal ground support equipment. Due to its rugged airframe and good performance, the An-24 was adapted to carry out many secondary missions such as ice reconnaissance and engine/propeller test-bed, as well as further development to produce the An-26 tactical transport, An-30 photo-mapping/survey aircraft and An-32 tactical transport with more powerful engines. Various projects were envisaged such as a four jet short/medium haul airliner and various iterations of powerplant. The main production line was at the Kiev-Svyatoshino (now "Aviant") aircraft production plant which built 985, with 180 built at Ulan Ude and a further 197 An-24T tactical transport/freighters at Irkutsk. Production in the USSR was shut down by 1978. Production continues at China's Xi'an Aircraft Industrial Corporation which makes licenced, reverse-engineered and redesigned aircraft as the Xian [Yunshuji] Y7, and its derivatives. Manufacture of the Y7, in civil form, has now been supplanted by the MA60 derivative with western engines and avionics, to improve performance and economy, and widen the export appeal. Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 18

  • Cellulose acetate film (Sicherheitsfilm)
    https://www.gaudry.be > Photo > Galerie
    [10] 22/04/2020 - Dernière modification le 14/05/2020 Cellulose acetate film, or safety film, is used in photography as a base material for photographic emulsions. It was introduced in the early 20th century by film manufacturers as a safe film base replacement for unstable and highly flammable nitrate film. Beginning with cellulose diacetate in 1909, this innovation continued with cellulose acetate propionate and cellulose acetate butyrate in the 1930s, and finally in the late 1940s, cellulose triacetate was introduced, alongside polyester bases. These less flammable substitutes for nitrate film were called safety film. The motion picture industry continued to use cellulose nitrate supports until the introduction of cellulose triacetate in 1948, which met the rigorous safety and performance standards set by the cinematographic industry. The chemical instability of cellulose nitrate material, unrecognized at the time of its introduction, has since become a major threat for film collections. Decay and the "vinegar syndrome" The first instance of cellulose triacetate degradation was reported to the Eastman Kodak Company within a decade of its introduction in 1948. The first report came from the Government of India, whose film was stored in hot, humid conditions. It was followed by further reports of degradation from collections stored in similar conditions. These observations resulted in continuing studies in the Kodak laboratories during the 1960s. Beginning in the 1980s, there was a great deal of focus upon film stability following frequent reports of cellulose triacetate degradation. This material releases acetic acid, the key ingredient in vinegar and responsible for its acidic smell. The problem became known as the "vinegar syndrome." Source: Wikipedia
    Mot clé = facture (titre ou description) | Niveau = 19

Document créé le 13/03/2010, dernière modification le 26/09/2019
Source du document imprimé : https://www.gaudry.be/tagcloud-rf-facture.html

L'infobrol est un site personnel dont le contenu n'engage que moi. Le texte est mis à disposition sous licence CreativeCommons(BY-NC-SA). Plus d'info sur les conditions d'utilisation et sur l'auteur.