8 pages, 6 articles pour «Albums»

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8 pages

  • [1] Albums photo
    31/01/2014 Affichage des albums photo sous la forme de grandes vignettes carrées. Lors de la sélection d'un album, toutes les photos de l'album sont présentées sous
    Mot clé = album | Niveau = 2

  • [2] Albums photo (liens)
    23/07/2011 Affichage des albums photo sous la forme de liens texte. Lors de la sélection d'un album, les photos de l'album sont présentées sous forme de miniatures
    Mot clé = album | Niveau = 2

  • [3] Istanbul, Basilica Cistern
    20/11/2018 The Basilica Cistern (Turkish: Yerebatan Sarayı - "Sunken Palace", or Yerebatan Sarnıcı - "Sunken Cistern"), is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul (formerly Constantinople), Turkey. The cistern, located 500 feet (150 m) southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I. History The name of this subterranean structure derives from a large public square on the First Hill of Constantinople, the Stoa Basilica, beneath which it was originally constructed. Before being converted to a cistern, a great Basilica stood in its place, built between the 3rd and 4th centuries during the Early Roman Age as a commercial, legal and artistic centre. The basilica was reconstructed by Ilius after a fire in 476. Ancient texts indicated that the basilica contained gardens, surrounded by a colonnade and facing the Church of Hagia Sophia According to ancient historians, Emperor Constantine built a structure that was later rebuilt and enlarged by Emperor Justinian after the Nika riots of 532, which devastated the city. Historical texts claim that 7,000 slaves were involved in the construction of the cistern. The enlarged cistern provided a water filtration system for the Great Palace of Constantinople and other buildings on the First Hill, and continued to provide water to the Topkapı Palace after the Ottoman conquest in 1453 and into modern times. In media The cistern was used as a location for the 1963 James Bond film From Russia with Love. In the film, it is referred to as being constructed by the Emperor Constantine, with no reference to Justinian. Its location is a considerable distance from the Soviet (now Russian) consulate, which is located in Beyoğlu, the "newer" European section of Istanbul, on the other side of the Golden Horn. The finale of the 2009 film The International takes place in a fantasy amalgam of the Old City, depicting the Basilica Cistern as lying beneath the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, which, in the film, is directly adjacent to the Süleymaniye Mosque. In the 2011 video game, Assassin's Creed: Revelations, the player controlled character, Ezio Auditore, is given the chance to explore a section of this cistern in a memory sequence entitled The Yerebatan Cistern. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - version 09Mar2012 See also in my flickr albums: Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque of Istanbul), Hagia Sophia, the Rüstem Pasha Mosque
    Mot clé = Istanbul, Basilica Cistern | Niveau = 11

  • [4] Istanbul, Topkapi palace - Imperial Council (Defterhāne)
    20/10/2018 Defterhāne This picture shows the third chamber called Defterhāne. Imperial Council The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building is the chamber in which the ministers of state, council ministers (Dîvân Heyeti), the Imperial Council, consisting of the Grand Vizier (Paşa Kapısı), viziers, and other leading officials of the Ottoman state, held meetings. It is also called Kubbealtı, which means "under the dome", in reference to the dome in the council main hall. It is situated in the northwestern corner of the courtyard next to the Gate of Felicity. The first Council chambers in the palace were built during the reign of Mehmed II, and the present building dates from the period of Süleyman the Magnificent by the chief architect Alseddin. It has since undergone several changes, was much damaged and restored after the Harem fire of 1665, and according to the entrance inscription it was also restored during the periods of Selim III and Mahmud II. From the 18th century onwards, the place began to lose its original importance, as state administration was gradually transferred to the Sublime Porte (Bâb-ı Âli) of the Grand Viziers. The last meeting of the Council in the palace chambers was held on Wednesday, August 30, 1876, when the cabinet (Vükela Heyeti) met to discuss the state of Murat V, who had been indisposed for some time. The council hall has multiple entrances both from inside the palace and from the courtyard. The porch consists of multiple marble and porphyry pillars, with an ornate green and white-coloured wooden ceiling decorated with gold. The floor is covered in marble. The entrances into the hall from outside are in the rococo style, with gilded grills to admit natural light. While the pillars are earlier Ottoman style, the wall paintings and decorations are from the later rococo period. Inside, the Imperial Council building consists of three adjoining main rooms. Two of the three domed chambers of this building open into the porch and the courtyard. The Divanhane, built with a wooden portico at the corner of the Divan Court (Divan Meydani) in the 15th century, was later used as the mosque of the council but was removed in 1916. There are three domed chambers: - The first chamber where the Imperial Council held its deliberations is the Kubbealtı. - The second chamber was occupied by the secretarial staff of the Imperial Divan. - In the adjacent third chamber called Defterhāne (this view) , records were kept by the head clerks. The last room also served as a document archive. On its facade are verse inscriptions, which mention the restoration work carried out in 1792 and 1819, namely under Sultan Selim III and Mahmud II. The rococo decorations on the façade and inside the Imperial Council date from this period. The main chamber Kubbealtı is, however, decorated with Ottoman Kütahya tiles. Three long sofas along the sides were the seats for the officials, with a small hearth in the middle. The small gilded ball that hangs from the ceiling represents the earth. It is placed in front of the sultan's window and symbolizes him dispensing justice to the world, as well as keeping the powers of his viziers in check. In the Imperial Council meetings, the political, administrative and religious affairs of the state and important concerns of the citizens were discussed. The Imperial Council normally met four times a week (Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday) after prayer at dawn. The meetings of the Imperial Council were run according to an elaborate and strict protocol. Council members such as the Grand Vizier, viziers, chief military officials of the Muslim Judiciary (Kazaskers) of Rumelia and Anatolia, the Minister of Finance or heads of the Treasury (defterdar), the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Reis-ül-Küttab) and sometimes the Grand Müfti (Sheikh ül-İslam) met here to discuss and decide the affairs of state. Other officials who were allowed were the Nişancilar secretaries of the Imperial Council and keepers of the royal monogram (tuğra) and the officials charged with the duty of writing official memoranda (Tezkereciler), and the clerks recording the resolutions. From the window with the golden grill, the Sultan or the Valide Sultan was able to follow deliberations of the council without being noticed. The window could be reached from the imperial quarters in the adjacent Tower of Justice (Adalet Kulesi). When the sultan rapped on the grill or drew the red curtain, the Council session was terminated, and the viziers were summoned one by one to the Audience Hall (Arz Odası) to present their reports to the sultan. All the statesmen, apart from the Grand Vizier, performed their dawn prayers in the Hagia Sophia and entered the Imperial Gate according to their rank, passing through the Gate of Salutation and into the divan chamber, where they would wait for the arrival of the Grand Vizier. The Grand Vizier performed his prayers at home, and was accompanied to the palace by his own attendants. On his arrival there, he was given a ceremonial welcome, and before proceeding to the imperial divan, he would approach the Gate of Felicity and salute it as if paying his respects to the gate of the sultan's house. He entered the chamber and took his seat directly under the sultan's window and council commenced. Affairs of the state were generally discussed until noon, when the members of the Council dined in the chambers and after which petitions were heard here. All the members of Ottoman society, men and women of all creeds, were granted a hearing. An important ceremony was held to mark the first Imperial Council of each new Grand Vizier, and also to mark his presentation with the Imperial Seal (Mühr-ü Hümayûn). The most important ceremony took place every three months during the handing out of salaries (ulûfe) to the Janissaries. The reception of foreign dignitaries was normally arranged for the same day, creating an occasion to reflect the wealth and might of the state. Ambassadors were then received by the Grand Vizier in the Council chambers, where a banquet was held in their honour. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - version 10Mar2012 See also in my flickr albums: Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque of Istanbul), Hagia Sophia, the Rüstem Pasha Mosque Camera infos: Camera: Nikon D7000 Lens: Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 EX DC OS Exposure 0.05 sec (1/20) Aperture f/6.3 Focal Length 20 mm ISO Speed 100 Date: February 22, 2012 GPS Latitude 41 deg 0' 45.92" N GPS Longitude 28 deg 59' 1.72" E
    Mot clé = Istanbul, Topkapi palace - Imperial Council (Defterhāne) | Niveau = 12

  • [5] Istanbul, Rüstem Paşa Camii
    17/11/2018 The Rüstem Pasha Mosque (Turkish: ' Rüstempaşa Camii') is an Ottoman mosque located in Hasırcılar Çarşısı (Strawmat Weavers Market) in the Tahtakale neighborhood, of the Eminönü district of Istanbul, Turkey. History The Rüstem Pasha Mosque was designed by Ottoman imperial architect Mimar Sinan for Grand Vizier Damat Rüstem Pasha (husband of one of the daughters of Suleiman the Magnificent, Princess Mihrimah). Rüstem Pasha died in July 1561 and the mosque was built after his death from around 1561 until 1563. Architecture Exterior The mosque was built on a high terrace over a complex of vaulted shops, whose rents were intended to financially support the mosque complex. Narrow, twisting interior flights of steps in the corners give access to a spacious courtyard. The mosque has a double porch with five domed bays, from which projects a deep and low roof supported by a row of columns. Interior The Rüstem Pasha Mosque is famous for its large quantities of exquisite İznik tiles, set in a very wide variety of beautiful floral and geometric designs, which cover not only the façade of the porch but also the mihrab, minbar, walls, columns and on the façade of the porch outside. These tiles exhibit the early use of a tomato-red color that would become characteristic of İznik pottery. Some of the tiles, particularly those in a large panel under the portico to the left main entrance, are decorated with sage green and dark manganese purple that are characteristic of the earlier 'Damascus ware' coloring scheme. No other mosque in Istanbul makes such a lavish use of these tiles. The plan of the building is basically that of an octagon inscribed in a rectangle. The main dome rests on four semi-domes; not on the axes but in the diagonals of the building. The arches of the dome spring from four octagonal pillars— two on the north, two on the south— and from piers projecting from the east and west walls. To the north and south are galleries supported by pillars and by small marble columns between them. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - version 25Feb2012 See also in my flickr albums: Hagia Sophia, Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque of Istanbul)
    Mot clé = Istanbul, Rüstem Paşa Camii | Niveau = 13

  • [6] Bernard Wright's strange house
    16/11/2018 The story: At the edge of a cliff somewhere on the coast, stands a strange house with a whole section seems to have disappeared in the waves. This is where patient Rork, the mysterious man with white hair ... Three days ago, Rork was contacted by Bernard Wright. He had finally decided Rork to follow him in his strange house, after telling him a strange story. Bernard Wright bought the house two months ago, because this kind of place stimulates creativity. But strange rumors about the place, although at the beginning of its installation the young writer did not notice anything strange, if not the remains of a machine's usefulness in an unknown parts the remains. The nightmare has actually started three days ago. After a slumber, Bernard Wright awoke to a letter written by him but the alphabet and the time of writing are unknown. The only certainty is this strange letter from his hand. Having heard of the immense knowledge of ancient writing Rork, so he decided to call on him to solve this riddle ... Referring to "A Century for a house" where Rork met the young writer Bernard Wright.
    Mot clé = Bernard Wright's strange house | Niveau = 14

  • [7] Bernard Wright's strange house - Chimney
    06/11/2018 The story: At the edge of a cliff somewhere on the coast, stands a strange house with a whole section seems to have disappeared in the waves. This is where patient Rork, the mysterious man with white hair ... Three days ago, Rork was contacted by Bernard Wright. He had finally decided Rork to follow him in his strange house, after telling him a strange story. Bernard Wright bought the house two months ago, because this kind of place stimulates creativity. But strange rumors about the place, although at the beginning of its installation the young writer did not notice anything strange, if not the remains of a machine's usefulness in an unknown parts the remains. The nightmare has actually started three days ago. After a slumber, Bernard Wright awoke to a letter written by him but the alphabet and the time of writing are unknown. The only certainty is this strange letter from his hand. Having heard of the immense knowledge of ancient writing Rork, so he decided to call on him to solve this riddle ... Referring to "A Century for a house" where Rork met the young writer Bernard Wright.
    Mot clé = Bernard Wright's strange house - Chimney | Niveau = 15

  • [8] Vietnam & Cambodge
    28/11/2018 Un nouvel album en préparation...
    Mot clé = Vietnam & Cambodge | Niveau = 16

6 articles

 

Document créé le 13/03/2010, dernière modification le 26/10/2018
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